Posts by mlewry

Newsletter – 3rd Quarter 2017

Posted by on Oct 2, 2017 in Newsletter | 0 comments

  TGR Partners Briefing 2nd Installment – 2017 Welcome to the 2nd installment of our 2017 TGR briefing. In this issue, we are highlighting opportunities to get yourself into a continuous improvement cycle. I believe it is important in times like these that we pull together to help people affected by the recent natural disasters through service, financial donations and prayers so that they can improve their situations as quickly as possible.  I have read stories of amazing acts of kindness, generosity and support between strangers and hope that spirit of unity continues long after these disasters. As we head into the fall of 2017, I continue to be amazed at the speed at which time is advancing in our world and in our lives. Perhaps it is the digital revolution and our seemingly endless appetite to improve and be more efficient that creates this sense of time’s increasing velocity.  Many of our clients feel the same way. With this awareness comes an opportunity to be vigilant about life’s priorities and to actively manage and allocate time to the competing priorities of personal, family, friends and profession. I, like many, often struggle to get this mix right on a consistent basis and want to encourage us all to take advantage of the velocity in our life not to just to “do” more but “do” more of the things that matter and that will help us maintain a healthier balance. In this issue, my friend and health and fitness extraordinaire Kali Stewart reminds us all of the importance of self-care (specifically sleep). It is the foundational element in order to have the physical and mental capability to perform at our best professionally and personally. Kali is an amazing coach that works with her clients nationally on their fitness, nutrition and weight using the latest technology to engage, coach and help provide accountability. The advice she offers in her article is sound and practical, requiring only a willing and committed person to reap the benefits that come from the healthy habit of sleep! (A little exercise and eating well wouldn't hurt either - I am talking to you road warriors!)   My partner Scott takes a page from some of our client’s playbook on design thinking and drawing on concepts presented in two great books Designing Your Life and Change by Design, he brings it together in a piece that will help you frame your professional life with new perspective and hopefully help you with your future career planning. We value your time and take care to present ideas that we hope you find useful and practical.  I hope you enjoy our latest effort in that quest!  As always, we would be grateful should the opportunity arise to help identify and attract top Management and Executive talent to your team! Sincerely, Matt Lewry, CEO Do you know how much sleep you REALLY need? Performance enhancement is often thought of in a sports setting, but in the last few years, next-level self-care practices have made their way into the corporate environment. To compete with the growing demands of being unceasingly connected, it’s more important than ever to develop healthy habits. At the foundation is better sleep.Most people know that they should get more sleep. And while most research circles back to getting the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep each night, this is a far stretch for most. A more realistic and productive focus for long-term success is to concentrate on developing better sleep quality, one habit at a time.Poor sleep hygiene not only negatively impacts immunity, hormone regulation (think weight gain), neuroendocrine function...

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Designing Your Life

Posted by on Sep 19, 2017 in Scott's Notes | 0 comments

Designing Your Life

What do you want to be when you grow up?   When’s the last time someone asked you that?  When you were 10 and you replied optimistically and enthusiastically, “A firefighter” or “A pilot” or “A doctor” or “An Executive Recruiter” (OK no one has ever said that last one!).  Since we are all constantly striving to grow and evolve as professionals and as human beings, it seems to me that we should ask ourselves this questions on a more regular basis.   When I am first introduced to someone who is seeking career guidance or needs help exploring options for their career, it is one of several that I ask them to answer.     Why does it matter?  Well, I guess it’s because it’s your life, and so the better you know the answer to that question professionally, the more successful you will be in articulating your goals and the more prepared you will be in assessing opportunities as they present themselves.  As Tim Brown asserts in Change by Design, it’s important to first inform ourselves about what is at stake and to expose the true costs (and benefits) of the choices we make. …if this is not what life is all about, I don’t know what is.   “How might you” describe what you want to be when you grow up or how you want to progress in your career and your personal life, etc?  And then how can you actually make it happen?   This is often a challenging question and I want to offer an approach to help you answer this question.   During the past year we’ve been working with more companies in the Bay Area and have found that those companies more than most have a “Design Thinking” mindset infused into their DNA.   That may be commonplace in the start-up world, and Dave Evans and Bill Burnett at the Stanford Business School wrote the book Designing your Life to help you apply similar concepts to thinking about your career. Of course, to do this, it’s helpful to understand some of the underlying principles of Design Thinking. And, keep in mind that while Design Thinking can be a Systematic Process, that does NOT mean it is a linear or sequential process…i.e., it can be messy!  Meaning  there is not one way or a “one best way” to move through the process.   So, with that in mind, here are some of principles of Design Thinking: Start with divergence:  Deliberately attempt to expand the range of options rather than narrow them. Heck, just start somewhere…that is what prototyping is all about.  You might have also heard it described as:  creating a “Minimum Viable Product” or “Failing Fast” as a way to learn from the experience Consider the constraints (in this case, in your life): What is it you Desire What is Feasible (possible given time, location, family constraints for example) Viable (primarily economical, but maybe health wise, etc) Plan for inspiration, ideation, implementation – just remember the SPARC acronym: “See-Plan-Act-Refine-Communicate” Define a “brief” to give yourself a starting point/framework/baseline and at the same time allow for serendipity, unpredictability, and the capricious whims of fate, for that is the creative realm from which breakthrough ideas emerge. If you already know what you are after, there is usually not much point in looking.   Of course, you must be in the right frame of mind to allow yourself to do this, so remember that: Curiosity does not thrive if you have grown cynical. The most successful people “embrace the mess.” They allow complexity to exist,...

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Newsletter #3 2016

Posted by on Nov 21, 2016 in Newsletter | 0 comments

This is our last newsletter of 2016 and it is amazing to me how quickly this year has passed by; it is as if time is accelerating! With the continual advance of technology, connectedness and an endless supply of distractions, it is no wonder that we are all busier than we have ever been. With this pace comes many exciting changes and opportunities, but requires focus and practice to achieve break-through moments. Last month we began a discussion of mastering the hiring process – a simple but elusive task! This month we finish our discussion on how leaders can achieve mastery of their hiring process and the steps to successfully establishing an effective hiring culture supported by practical and effective tools. We have partnered with many clients in implementing this to reduce the time spent on hiring, and improving quality and brand equity.

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Hiring Mastery (Continued)

Posted by on Nov 17, 2016 in Scott's Notes | 0 comments

In our last newsletter, I posted that despite all the technological advances we’ve achieved, the ability to identify, attract, and hire great candidates has become more challenging rather than simpler.  Part of the reason is that we’ve either forgotten or abandoned some basic human principles as a result of our misplaced overreliance on that technology.  By keeping in mind the human element and being purposeful and well-intended on the ultimate goal, we can collectively find and hire the right person for the role. In order to assist with that, I suggested there are some fundamental ways to improve the internal talent acquisition and improve results even when “life happens,” which include: 1)    Recruit your interview team: Ensure that only the people you need, who can add value or are organizationally necessary, are part of the interview team.  Gain their commitment to the process by investing time with them on the requirements of the position, explaining your priorities and what you need from them as participants.  Have back-ups for when there are scheduling conflicts.  Set expectations that any candidates they see will have been well-screened and are serious contenders.  Avoid wasting days after interviews by letting them know up front that their written feedback is important and required immediately after the interview. 2)    Schedules:  These are VERY fluid when dealing with the daily demands on executives (both clients and candidates). If you recruit a committed team of interviewers (and back-ups), this will ensure they prioritize your interviews. The more people on the interview team, the more schedules to manage, so start with a MVP approach (minimally viable participants). Set the number of interview rounds and the type (Skype, phone, in-person) at the start of the search (and stick to it as the candidates’ expectations will be based on this information). Be conscious that you will be recruiting passive candidates that have a job and balance the number of rounds and locations to a minimum. Use technology like Skype, employ an interview day, and schedule on-site interviews on Fridays or Mondays.  Design your interview process to be effective and candidate-friendly. Recognize the negative correlation between large numbers of interviewers and rounds of interviews, and the ability to identify and hire the best talent. 3)    Assessment:  How well your team interviews leaves an impression on the candidate.  Passive candidates are equally interested in a good interview process that helps ensure a good fit for both parties. Set a tenor of “Qualifying Candidates IN” rather than “Screening Them OUT.”  Give each of the interview team members a role.  This ensures that you get pertinent questions answered and minimizes the candidate repeatedly answering the same questions. When your interviewers are reading from the same playbook (consistent understanding of the position and requirements), it reflects well on the company and increases the candidate’s interest. 4)    The Perfect Candidate: DOES NOT EXIST.  Knowing your top three priorities will enable you to rank the pool and make a decision confidently on a final candidate.  Remember, you are likely hiring someone who has 80%+ of your desired requirements but all three of the top priorities. Have confidence in the process, from the extensive research, engagement and screening on the front end, to the interview team assessment on the backend.  Utilizing this process, a pool of 2-4 highly qualified and interested candidates is an excellent result and should result in a successful hire. 5)    Selling:  It is a two-way street (that is why they call it “recruiting!”).  If a candidate appears to be a good fit based on the responses to your questions, leave them time to ask their questions and...

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Newsletter #2 2016

Posted by on Aug 26, 2016 in Newsletter | 0 comments

TGR Partners Newsletter Second Quarter, 2016 As we head into the final days of summer we at TGR want to express our gratitude for our client partners and for the amazing professionals that we have had the opportunity to work with so far in 2016. It has been a fantastic year and we have successfully conducted as many searches for our clients in the first half of the year as we did all of last year! We attribute this success to slow and steady improvement in the economy, a continued tightening of the experienced professional labor market, more movement in the market and the growth in our brand recognition through hard work and successful projects for our clients. August is typically the beginning of the busiest three months of the year for hiring as clients return from vacations, 2017 budgets are finalized and the realization that year end is looming. This month with hiring about to spike and less then 120 days left in the year Scott Kriscovich has some excellent advice on hiring efficiency. He shares some of the basics that are critical in establishing the right hiring culture as the foundation for success. Once a leader establishes this culture there are practical and effective tools that many of our clients have consistently implemented to reduce the hiring timeline and improve quality of hires and improve their brand equity in the market. This is not difficult but often requires discipline, consistency and accountability. When used in conjunction with a highly efficient identification, engagement and screening process such as TGR’s, time to hire can be radically improved. We are blessed to have an amazing network of experts that we call on to augment the services we provide our clients. For the next few newsletters we will be highlighting the work of our most innovative partners and discuss the work they are doing in and around organization effectiveness, assessing talent and effectively managing Millennials – all topics relevant to those we serve. I hope you enjoy this month’s articleabout our partner Shannon Jordan on the importance of understanding EQ (emotional intelligence) in our teams in an increasingly collaborative workspace. If you have any comments or suggestions for future content, we welcome those at info@tgrpartners.com. Sincerely, Matt Lewry, CEO Minding your EQ According to the World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs Report, emotional intelligence will be one of the top 10 workplace skills in 2020. In a recent survey reported in Fast Company, 71% of hiring managers stated they valued emotional intelligence in an employee over IQ; 75% said they were more likely to promote a highly emotionally intelligent worker; and 59% claimed they’d pass up a candidate with a high IQ but low emotional intelligence. This trend may be driven by an increasing collaboration load. As business becomes more global and cross-functional, silos are breaking down, connectivity is increasing, and teamwork is seen as a key to organizational success. According to data collected over the past two decades by a Wharton research team, time spent in collaborative activities has ballooned by 50% or more. Consider a typical week in your own organization. How much time do people spend in meetings, on the phone, and responding to e-mails? At many companies the proportion hovers around 80%. The stretch to communicate, collaborate, influence, come to consensus, and work with diverse perspectives and temperaments can seem like a tall order particularly to employees in technical fields who didn’t necessarily sign up for the “people side” of the business. The awareness that emotional intelligence is an important job skill has been growing in recent...

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